You are browsing the latest articles for ‘Physical Activity’ & diabetes

Regular exercise is the most important lifestyle decision we can make – everyone benefits. For people with diabetes it is especially important.  Regular physical activity plays an important role in taking care of your diabetes by keeping your heart and lungs...

by Sheila Walker, RD, CDE, M.Ed on Apr 20th 2013

We know that regular physical activity is associated with numerous health benefits for the person with diabetes.  These include an improvement in quality of life, and a significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factors and mortality.  Despite this many of...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jul 18th 2012

The Challenge: How do we encourage our clients with diabetes to throw on their runners and get mov’in? Diabetes educators are well aware of the benefits of exercise to those with diabetes.  In the past, assessing the client’s readiness for change was often...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

What you want to achieve is up to you, but getting and staying healthy is truly the ultimate goal. Start by doing something you love and aim for at least 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week. Add a little more time for being active whenever you feel ready. And...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

Physical activity can affect your blood glucose for up to 12 hours. When getting started, check your blood glucose just before and right after your activity, as well as several hours after your activity stops. It is a great way to see the benefit of physical activity....

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

“Resistance training” is nothing to be afraid of. It simply means using weight or weight machines to work your muscles. A weight can be anything from a dumbbell to a can of soup from the pantry. Another good tool to use is a resistance band. Resistance training...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

A pedometer is a small device worn at the waistband that tracks the number of steps you take. It’s a great little tool to help you track how active you really are, and motivate you to do more. The average person takes anywhere from 2,000 to 5,000 steps in a day...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

A very simple yet effective way to tell if you’re overexhausting yourself is the Talk Test. Quite simply, if during exercise you are breathing so heavily that you can’t talk you are pushing your body too much.   Another common way of measuring how hard...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

Take time to think about what activities you enjoy. If you don’t like riding stationary bicycles, then don’t. Find what you do like. The only consideration is to keep impact exercises to a minimum if you have any foot complications, such as neuropathy. Look...

by Canadian Diabetes Care Guide on Jan 23rd 2012

Learning how your blood sugars respond is important when you exercise. By taking your blood glucose reading immediately before and after exercising, you will know whether it is safe to begin exercise for that day, and how many points your reading drops due to exercise. Before...